Women Farmers



Producer Lacy Roberts brings us an hour of conversation with and about female farmers. First, we learn why photographer Audra Mulkern started the Female Farmer Project and what it reveals about female back-to-the-land farmers. Next, we sit around the kitchen table with Tracy and Margaret, owners of Dixon, Montana’s County Rail Farm, and two of the farm’s young interns, Kitty and Morgan, who describe falling for organic farming. Finally, farmer-mom-journalist-editor Courtney Lowery Cowgill of Prairie Heritage Farm near Power, Montana shares how she, a farmer’s daughter who vowed to never marry a farmer, did exactly that. Cowgill’s description of this phase of her career: “part-time job, full-time Mom, part-time farmer and full-time cook and keeper of the house, the finances, the schedule, the diaper bag…”

This show first aired July 22, 2014 on Montana Public Radio.

Health, Mental Health, Psychology and Global Warming: a Conversation



Jen, Kevin, Beth

Amy talks with three Missoula-area professionals — nurse Beth Schenk and psychotherapists Jen Robohm and Kevin Dohr. These experts share research and their professional and personal experiences approaching and understanding global challenges like climate change. They discuss individual and societal barriers and opportunities in our efforts to successfully address, be solution-oriented, and be hopeful in this time of rapid change.Yes, hopeful!

Behind the Scenes at the Red Ants Pants Music Festival



The tiny town of White Sulphur Springs swells at the end of July when thousands arrive for fine music and a good time. It’s the Red Ants Pants Festival, associated with the Red Ants Pants Company, manufacturer of work wear for women, and benefitting the Red Ants Pants Foundation, focused in part on projects to help women succeed. Producer Beth Judy talks by phone with Festival Operations Manager Allie Olson and PR/Press Director Kat Healy. Find out more about this festival phenom and how it all goes down. This summer’s festival dates are July 24-27; more info at http://www.redantspantsmusicfestival.com.


Missoula Colony 19: Salina Chatlain and Kate Morris



This week on “In Other Words:” producer Ann Szalda-Petree welcomes Salina Chatlain, producer of the 2014 Missoula Colony, and Missoula playwright Kate Morris. Included is a reading from Kate’s play, “Church.”

The 19th Annual Missoula Colony takes place July 12th – 19th, 2014, and brings Montana and nationally-known playwrights together for a week to write, talk about, rehearse and perform staged readings of new plays. For the first time, The Colony is highlighting plays written, directed, produced, and organized by women. The Montana Repertory Theatre defines the mission of the Missoula Colony as “fostering great writing for the next generation of theatre and film in an atmosphere of generosity, creative fervor, breathtaking beauty, and laughter.”



Immigration Policy is a Women’s Issue: Pramila Jayapal



Activist Pramila Jayapal is one of the United States’ best thinkers today. An immigrant from India herself, she came to the US at 16, thanks to her parents’ sacrifices, and worked on Wall Street after college, but then turned to issues affecting immigrants, migrants, and America’s diverse populations.

Bad immigration policy disproportionately and adversely affects women, Jayapal argues, and immigration reformers and women’s movement organizations need to unite on the issue. Today, Jayapal chairs the “We Belong Together” campaign on women and immigration (www.webelongtogether.org). Missoula-area activist and author Kay Whitlock converses with Jayapal, and Jayapal’s essay with Gloria Steinem on immigration policy as a women’s issue is read after the conversation. Originally aired June 10, 2014. Produced by Kay Whitlock and Beth Judy, with thanks to Beth Anne Austein.

Pramila Jayapal

Pramila Jayapal

Voices from Butte I


       Frequent In Other Words contributor Clark Grant recently moved to Butte to begin a new community radio station.  Work is underway to fund and build KBMF 102.5 through the recently formed Butte America Foundation.  In the first of (hopefully) many interviews in this series, Clark talks to Jo, a long time resident of Butte and book store owner, Mary, an employee at the bookstore, Dark and Carson; new arrivals to Butte, and Clark is interviewed himself by Ann.  Clark asks questions about the history of the area, the present state of the city, thoughts on the Berkeley pit, and what new-comers can contribute to the vibrant culture of Butte.